I’m Back, Kinda.

Well…. umm hi, it’s been a minute – 5 months if we really want to get technical.

I suppose I have some explaining to do.

Via Giphy

Writing and connecting to people through words has been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember, but recently I misplaced that passion – I’m not going to say I lost it, because that would mean it’s not coming back, and you best believe that it’ll be back.

I think if I had to pinpoint when I realised I loved writing, it would have been in year 3 or 4, so around 10 years old – I was part of this counselling group for kids that had been through, what my primary school considered, a ‘trauma’.

I now jokingly refer to this group as ‘The Sad Kids Club’; because what better way to make kids who had been through some shit feel more isolated and different to their peers, than by pulling them out of class and telling them they needed to be part of a special group, because what had happened to them wasn’t ‘normal’ – figures, right?!

Anyway, as part of Sad Kids Club (which had a mixture of kids who had lost parents, had a broken family, their home lives weren’t ideal etc) one of the activities we had to do was write letters about our situations and try to be open about the feelings we were experiencing.

Well didn’t I fucking go to town; I remember my head being buried in thickly lined paper and my pencil (because I wasn’t old enough for a pen license yet, god damn) moving at a mile a minute.

I was somehow able write down every little thing I had been feeling but hadn’t been able to express physically – how I was sad, angry and confused all at the same time and it made me feel sane again, the weight that had lifted was enormous, just by putting some words on a piece of paper.

From then, whenever I felt anything, I wrote it down.

So as ridiculous as I think Sad Kids Club was, I guess I have to thank it for showing me that you can connect with people and give a voice to those who might not otherwise be heard through the power of writing.

But over the last 5 or so months I’ve questioned my passion for writing because I had been happy, which you might think is crazy ridiculous and would have the opposite effect, but for years I had always relied on pain to fuel my writing, whether it my own or someone else’s.

I didn’t think I could write as well about being in a good place mentally or that it would reach someone in the same way that talking about being in a shitty mental state does – if that makes sense?

But why the fuck should I not be yelling from the rooftops that my head is happy, my body is healthy and that the world isn’t so grey all the time?!

That’s not to say that I don’t still have bad days and that I’m anxiety free because ya girl is not impartial to a mental breakdown – but I’m not so sad anymore and that’s really, really nice.

And I suppose I didn’t want to jinx that by writing about it or feel guilty for taking care of and focusing solely on myself for the last few months, but I’m now realising that it is totally okay, and I’m allowed to have time out to become reinspired and reinvigorated creatively again.

I guess that brings us to now and to let you know that it’s okay to maybe lose sight of what you love for a minute, but if you pick yourself back up, dust yourself off and come back bigger and better than ever, you’ll be fine.

I’m ready to start writing again, to find people who amaze me and give them a voice and just have conversations about the important things happening in our world today.

So here I am; not making any promises to put content out every day, or every week for that matter, but I’m definitely making a comeback to the storytelling space and I’m hella excited about it.

Mental Health – are we doing enough?

DISCLAIMER – I’ve literally written and re-written this piece like twenty fucking times because I don’t want this to feel like it’s a pity party, that’s not the aim. I don’t want pity, I don’t want you to feel sorry for me, I just want to put this out there in the hope that it might help even just one person feeling the same way I have or to inspire others to reach out to their friends if they don’t seem okay. So apologies if this is all over the place, but I need to get some shit off my chest.

I had a friend reach out to me recently because she’d noticed through my Instagram that in a lot of my stories I’d been looking defeated/exhausted and not my upbeat self; I cannot begin tell you how important it was to me that she asked – even though I didn’t think I needed someone to check in on me, it was really comforting that she did.

This isn’t even a friend that I speak to or see all that often, but she had the decency and the heart to see if I was okay, to see if I needed to talk or if there was anything I needed – we need more people like her on this earth, because simply checking in on someone to show that someone gives a shit can honestly save a life.

R U OK? Day is an incredible initiative to get people talking about mental health, but we need to be asking the question more often, not just when prompted by a day – we NEED to do more. People are taking their lives every day because they feel like there is no other option or that it doesn’t matter what happens to them.

IT MATTERS.

I have been wanting to write this piece for the longest time but have put it off for fear of judgement and a fear that people will think it is ‘attention seeking’ – which is beyond ironic because that’s the stigma I want to help break. So, bear with me if this is all over the place, my mind is running at a hundred miles an hour trying to get everything out in a way that might make an impact.

Writing is a tool I’ve always used to tell other people’s stories. I love having the ability to give someone a voice who might not otherwise speak up – so why am I so scared to speak up myself?

It’s a double-edged sword.

I want so desperately to help break the stigma around having a mental illness, but I’ve been too terrified to publicly talk about my struggles to it’s fullest extent.

I’ve never shied away from admitting I struggle with anxiety, but I’ve also never gone into depth about it because I don’t want people to think any less of me, which is so ridiculous because I will be the first to tell anyone that it’s worse to keep things to yourself.

I’ve had Generalised Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder for around 13-14 years and always felt like I’ve had a relatively good handle on it – developing coping mechanisms if I feel a panic attack coming on or letting someone know I’m just not doing too well.

But last year I missed all the signs that my mental health was declining because my symptoms weren’t like my usual anxiety symptoms – shortness of breath, restlessness, exhaustion etc.

For the first time in my life, I fell into a depression that I was so unaware I had; I had talked myself into thinking that I had something physically wrong me, as opposed to mentally.

So, for someone who is deals with mental health issues to miss signs and symptoms, how can we expect others to notice symptoms before it’s too late?

WE NEED MORE EDUCATION – it’s as simple as that and it needs to start young.

Education on the little things that might indicate something is wrong; not just typical symptoms like withdrawal from social activities, problems sleeping, irritability etc – even though they are important indicators to look for also.

I’m talking about about people who, at least on the surface, seem successful at school, at work, or at home. On the inside, however, they could be experiencing a near-constant state of depression and anxiety.

But because these people are often high achieving, no one thinks that there is anything ‘wrong’ with them and they themselves may not understand why these things are happening to them because they can’t find a ‘good enough reason’ to feel the way they do.

I didn’t realise that dizziness, stomach issues, fatigue, weakened immune system, loss or increase of appetite, chest pain and so many other things could be indicative of an underlying mental health issue. I just assumed that there was something physical going on and never thought that it could mean I was developing depression because everything else in my life was in a really good place.

I had literally lost any and all motivation to leave my house, see anyone, WRITE (which is literally the thing I love doing most in this world) and do just about anything that involved effort, but I kept telling myself that it was just because I was so sick all the time, not ‘sad’.

We need to be told at a very young age to look out for these ‘silent’ signs within ourselves so we know what they could be before it gets too overwhelming – we also need to be taught how to look after our mental health the same way we are taught to look after our physical health, one is no more important than the other.

Awareness and acceptance of mental illness may be getting stronger, but suicide rates are still climbing, so are we doing enough? I don’t think so.

Mental health education needs to start in school, it needs to be more spoken about on traditional media platforms, it needs to be a focus of every workplace, open conversations need to be had among friends and family – we all need to educate each other.

We also all need to remember check in on our mates, our family and even people we may have lost touched with, far more regularly than we do, you never know when a simple: ‘Hey, how are you doing?’ could save a life.

Shoutout to everyone who may be struggling at the moment, you’re fucking awesome and don’t ever think otherwise.

Belle With Love 2018 Spring Racing Lipstick Edit

IMG_5694 (1).jpgSpring has finally sprung my babes, and although it has not brought the sunshine as yet, it’s time for a beauty overhaul. Push those vampy, wine and plum hues to the back of your makeup bag and introduce some luxe pinks, vibrant reds and oh so pretty nude lippies that march to the drum that is the spring racing carnival. “Florals? For spring? Ground breaking” comes to mind, but let me tell you I am here for it.

Here are the hot tips, which to no surprise, have nothing to do with odds or sweeps. You can ace the Belle With Love 2018 Spring Racing Lipstick Edit trackside, champagne in hand of course.

Candy & Sweet

IMG_6112.jpg

MAC Amplified Lipstick – Girl About Town

A creamy and lustrous, bright fuchsia that will turn heads.

Available at MAC & Mecca Maxima.

STILLA Stay All Day Liquid Lipstick – Bella

True to its name, beautiful & long lasting.

Available at Mecca Maxima.

REVLON Ultra HD Matte Lip Colour – Obsession

This hot pink lip colour is creamy and matte, magic.

Available at Priceline.

MAC Frost Lipstick – Angel

Rosé and pearls combined in a subtle kiss.

Available at MAC & Mecca Maxima.

Striking & Deep

IMG_6123.jpg

MAC Satin Lipstick– Rebel

Make it known that you are the party, with daring plum lip.

Available at MAC & Mecca Maxima.

YSL Tatouage Couture Matte Stain -1 Rouge Tatouage

A vibrant pink red for when you want to be fancy, but the champagne is flowing.

Available at Mecca Maxima.

NATIO Lip Colour – Crimson

True red to compliment your beautiful smile.

Available at Priceline.

REVLON Super Lustrous Lipstick – Teak Rose

Make a statement with a glossy deep burgundy.

Available at Priceline.

Champagne & Peaches

IMG_6101.jpg

KKW Crème Liquid Lipstick – Kim

Show stopping with a smokey eye.

Available at KKW Beauty.

NAPOLEON PERDIS Devine Goddess Lipstick – Hess

Your lips, but better in a sheer cool toned nude.

Available at Priceline.

MAC Matte Lipstick – Tropic Tonic

A full powered coral, because you love to be the centre of attention.

Available at MAC & Mecca Maxima.

YOUNGBLOOD Colour Crays Matte Lip Crayon – Surfer Girl

Because pastel and peachy is perfect.

Available at Youngblood.

www.bellewithlove.com.au

@bellewithlove

All things crystal and energy healing with Cayla Tudehope

38072591_1854239521320669_3289409194515496960_n

For the last month or so, it’s been battle of the babes for the Badgelor’s heart, and we just can’t stop talking about it.

There’s been no shortage of drama since it’s premier in August – from past flings to full blown bullying.

However, unless you have live under a rock with no common sense whatsoever, you’ll know that a  lot of these reality tv shows – the bachelor included – like to manipulate ‘characters’ and story lines to keep you coming back week to week.

Conversations are cut and only portions of peoples personalities are shown – perhaps one of the most manipulated personalities was Cayla Tudehope or as they dubbed her ‘Crystal Cayla’.

Cayla is an energy healer and runs her crystal jewelry business, Love Loons.

WHAT IS ENERGY HEALING?

‘Energy Healing is a term for a number of different techniques that manipulate the energy in our Physical or Subtle bodies to regain balance and facilitate our body’s natural ability to heal.’  – www.loveloons.com

41267995_338182596927185_3546708542592195752_n.jpgSpirituality shouldn’t be something that is made fun of, nor is the beliefs of one person just because they differ from yours and that is, in essence, what happened while she was on the show.

Cayla is a very kind, compassionate and spiritual person and I was fortunate enough to chat to her about her time on The Bachelor and learn about all things energy healing and Love Loons.

What drove your decision to go on the bachelor?

‘I honestly just felt guided by the universe to apply, I was even a day or two late with the application . I never thought or ever had the intention prior to ever competing against other women on a show like that . But I learnt a lot of lessons in there , met some soul family members and so overall it was meant to be.’ 

The way the show portrayed you isn’t at all even a glimpse of your personality, if you had one sentence to explain the type of human you are what would it be?

‘That I care about us evolving in consciousness, that I care about people , about the collective. That the interests of us as a whole, for me, is my biggest focus . I’m here of service, we are one & I want to help us all evolve on our spiritual journey.’

When did you get into energy healing/crystals?

‘I got into energy healing around 17-18 years old . But crystals a few years before that. Particularly in high school I started to learn more.’

What do you love about energy healing?

‘That it enables us to see ourselves than more than our 3D self and on a metaphysical higher consciousness level of spirit,  here to learn life lesson & become better people & change the earth we live on.’ 

What do you want other people to understand about crystals and energy healing?

‘That we have mental, emotional, physical & spiritual needs that are all connected & energy healing and crystals assist on these levels.’

How important is holistic living to you?

‘It’s everything. Having the lifestyle and everyday something new challenging you , trying to be conscious of things – I’m a minimalist in every sense. I’m happiest when I have very little possessions because I know what it’s like to be the most miserable person ever & no amount of possessions can make you happy – so therefore I derive my focus on enjoying the simple things in life.’

Where did Love Loons, your crystal jewelry business, come from?

‘The name got told to me in the middle of the night when I woke up & I love the meaning of the loon, which symbolises hope & with Tudehope being my last name there was that connection . The loon to the natives meant rising from the ashes & that to me symbolises the trials we go through in life.’ Cayla creates beautifully crafted crystal necklaces, each crystal has a different healing property – You can purchase them here.

What’s your favourite crystal and why?

‘I have quite a few favourites as they help at different times but a few are:
Pietersite – Pietersite is an important tool in bringing pent-up, internalized feelings and conflicts to the surface, allowing the unsaid and unexamined to erupt in an emotional outpouring that not only clears the air, but begins the process of healing. 

Danburite – Danburite point a high vibrational crown chakra crystal to activate your higher abilities , higher self and intuition . 

Rose quartz – The soft pink emanations of Rose Quartz comforts and heals any wounds the heart has suffered, penetrating the inner chambers of the Heart Chakra where emotional experiences are recorded and stored.’

40382328_2253987418207146_4130627692514421803_n.jpg

What did going on the show teach you?

‘So much that it would take days to explain – my producer in particular was an amazing person who I believe helped me remember who I really am. Own who I am and release any unhealed parts of myself that I didn’t even know I needed healing , I learnt a lot from the relationships with the girls and made some life long friends .

My biggest focus in there was integrity , honour & intentions are everything , and I upheld myself to that.

Any final words or wisdom for our readers?

Create a life of meaning , of purpose , of being conscious of the lessons we learn along the way , to be compassionate , loving & kind to others but just as importantly to ourselves. Self love is one of the biggest life lessons that took me awhile to work through and I still have some more work to do . Let’s make this world a better place.


You can find Cayla on instagram here

The Question Igniting Discussion About Mental Illness

woman-2609115_1280.jpg

“IT’S LIKE YOU’RE SAD ALL THE TIME AND THAT’S THE ONLY THING YOU CAN FEEL, YOU’RE DROWNING IN SADNESS AND YOU DON’T SEE A POINT TO ANYTHING AND NOTHING IS GOING TO MAKE YOU FEEL BETTER.”

Every morning as Sophie*, 22, opens her eyes and peeks out from under the bedcovers she is flooded with the crippling fear that today she will disappoint someone.

“The bed is safe, it’s warm, I don’t have to be anywhere and fake that I’m ok, I can’t disappoint anyone there,” she said.

Thoughts of failing uni or not being there for someone and not knowing how to support them plague Sophie like a dark cloud and leave her in a constant state of unease.

Anxiety and depression crept into Sophie’s life when she was just 16, slowly infiltrating her mind before coming to a climax two years later.

“I started getting feelings of sadness around 16, but it would come and go and then it fully hit when I was 18 and doing VCE, coming out of school and had the pressure of friendships.”

She said sometimes her thoughts were so distressing that she turned to hurting herself to stop the whirlwind in her mind.

“I’d sometimes have thoughts like the world would be better if I wasn’t here; Mum and Dad wouldn’t worry about me if I wasn’t here, I wouldn’t have to feel like I’m disappointing people, I wouldn’t have to struggle every day,” she said.

“I’d bang my head into things or piss the cat off so she’d give me a bit of a nip.

“For a little while it would put my mind on ‘ow that hurts’ and give me something to focus on to help me stop panicking and stop being sad, but it never really helped for long.”

But Sophie still struggled to get people to understand her mental health condition.

“It’s hard to make people understand, it’s hard sometimes to even get across how you feel or why you feel that way, you can just be feeling it,” she said.

“It can be that people roll their eyes and people don’t want to hear about it.

“I would call in sick to work but I would make up a story that I had a migraine because I feel like if I said ‘I’m mentally unwell today’ no one really gets that it’s preventing you from leaving the house.”

download

R U Ok Day campaign director Katherine Newton says the mental health foundation is working to change the stigma surrounding mental health.

The R U Ok Day conversation convoy began in Geelong last month and involves four vehicles and a dedicated team travelling to regional cities and towns to “equip people with the skills and the confidence to start a conversation” about mental health.

“We do know that many Australians aren’t comfortable asking the question because they’re worried about the reaction that they might get if they do ask, and indeed one of those reactions might be ‘no I’m not ok’,” Ms Newton said.

She said the convoy, now in its second year, aimed to “link people up with services in their local area” because regional areas have higher rates of suicide than metro areas.

It shouldn’t be just one day, you should ask ‘are you ok?’ every day,” Ms Newton said.

Sophie is far from alone in her battle with mental illness, she is one of the four million Australians who report having a mental or behavioural condition, Australian Bureau of Statistics 2014-15 data shows.   

Anxiety-related conditions are most frequently reported, with at least 2.6-million people or 11.2 per cent of the population suffering from the condition and 2.1-million people or 9.3 per cent of the population suffering from mood disorders, which include depression.

For now Sophie is holding out hope for a day when talking about mental illness will be as easy as talking about physical illness.

“I think it’s a lot more open to talk about, it’s definitely addressed more in things, there’s posters and R U Ok Day, but I still think there’s still a stigma around mental illness, so there’s some way to go but maybe not a long way,” she said.

The Conversation convoy will finish its journey in Canberra on September 12 in time to celebrate R U Ok Day on September 13, after visiting 20 cities and towns to spread a message of hope.

HOW TO ASK ‘ARE YOU OK?’

R U Ok Day campaign director Katherine Newton said it was important to keep an eye on people who were going through a relationship breakdown, grief, physical illness or a difficult time at work.

“It might be people are withdrawn or their performance is suffering at work, they might be distant, or it might be strange behaviour like being maniac or overexaggerating things,” she said.

Ms Newton explains the four simple steps to asking ‘are you ok?’

1. ASK

“If you notice anything out of the ordinary you should ask them if they’re ok in a comfortable and quiet place that is good for them.”

2. LISTEN

“It is really, really important to listen with an open mind, try not to interrupt or jump in and try not to solve the problem, quite often people will just want to verbalise what’s on their mind and quite often speaking with someone and having those thoughts out there can really help.”

3. ENCOURAGE ACTION

“The next step is about action and that’s about trying to find a way to help them manage the load, so it might be for example that they go and see their GP or talk to their manager or a teacher or someone else they feel comfortable talking to.

“They could give Lifeline a call or contact other support services or websites that have good resources, it doesn’t have to be many things it’s just one thing that will help them manage the load.”

4. CHECK IN

“Once someone has shared that they’re not doing very well, it’s really important to get alongside them and see how they’re doing in a few days.”

*Name changed to protect privacy.

Written by Olivia Reed

Healthy Lifestyle tips from Personal Trainer and Fitness Model Kate Collins

36147832_2054015777942150_1517494116991107072_n.jpg

I spoke to Geelong based personal trainer and all-round boss babe Kate Collins about her background in the fitness community and what some of her tips are for those wanting to start and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Tell our readers a little bit about yourself

  • Kate Collins 27

  • Twin.

  • Grew up on property just outside Winchelsea (Geelong)

  • Played every sport at school I could possibly sign up to

  • I have been a personal trainer for 8 years – it’s a passion not just a job.

  • Worked on the Gold Coast for 3 years at one of the biggest gyms in QLD as a personal trainer

  • I have also competed in several IFBB figure comps

How did you first get into PT/fitness?

“Well always been surrounded by sport,  I mean having having a twin is one of the most competitive aspects of wanting to improve or be good at everything I tried.

I played tennis and rode horses from a very young age and always made up games in the paddock, so in terms of fitness, I was always running around.

In primary school I loved hanging with the boys playing footy, soccer and anything to do with being tough and competitive!

With PT, it was something  I was very fascinated by, you don’t need much equipment,  just your hands and an eye for detail and the passion to want to succeed – that was me from a very young age.

I thought I wanted to get into outdoor education after leaving school and soon realised you had to go to uni for many years. That was definitely not me!

So I was working at Anaconda and Bended Elbow (a bar in Geelong) and across the road was the VFA leaning (an educational institute for sports fitness). I constantly looked at it and thought, I need to go there ASAP.

Who wants to spend all day inside, pouring beer, when I could be outside helping people make the most of their lives whilst enjoying the sun. So I walked across the road and signed up!

I could confidently say I was a nerd when it came to the teaching part, I would sit at the front of the room and even study… me + study is probably the biggest oxymoron! But I loved it. I would study in advance it was just perfect for me!

As soon as I got my diploma I walked into Goodlife Geelong and said: yo yo yo. I’m new. I’m excited. Do you need a pt? And Walah I got a job! I was pumped and have been every day since I started.”

36976411_685904011769204_2753541123019374592_n.jpg

Top 5 tips for starting a healthier lifestyle

  • Drink Water

  • Get a good night Sleep

  • Get away from toxic people and people that don’t support you

  • Get off your bloody phone and look up

  • Train and sweat daily!

  • Food is 80% of your results. So keep it ‘clean’ and lean

Top tips for maintaining once you’ve hit goals.

  • Keep consitent.

  • Don’t stop making new goals

  • Keep it healthy

  • Follow the tips above

Any parting words of wisdom?

 The time is going to pass anyway so make it worthwhile and start now.

You can follow Kate’s personal training Instagram here to keep up to date with all things KCPT!

Meet girl boss, Maddison Osburn

Meet Maddison Osburn , an Australian Expert Skin Clinician and the mind behind Geelong based skin clinic, The Aesthetic Skin Clinic. 

The Aesthetic Skin Clinic is a boutique medical cosmetic clinic combing expertise with state of the art treatments, delivered in a high-end boutique practice, at an affordable price point.

Maddison first started in the beauty industry when she was 17, she was working long days and nights travelling all over Melbourne doing spray tanning and skin treatments but always wanted to be her own #girlboss one day.

“I graduated and landed a role working with lasers fresh out of school, so I had an early start in the industry and have now been working with skin and laser therapies for close to 10 years. I always knew I wanted my own brand that inspired and educated women about their skin,” says Maddison.

Since opening the doors in September of 2016, the clinic has gained monumental amounts of #TASCSQUAD members as well as one hell of a social media following.

Currently the TASC girls see over 40-50 patients a day, with a mix of laser treatments, skin therapies and injectables.

Olivia&Thyme

“I had always wanted to have my own business, I loved the idea of being my own boss, inspiring staff and clients and really having a passion for treating people with modalities that I know work. It was about a 6-month process from the planning to the open stage, it happened quite fast and has never slowed down since,” she says.

Opening TASC didn’t come without its obstacles for Maddison, but failure to launch TASC and follow her dreams was not on the cards.

“I was declined finance for start up from 2 different companies as I was young and a high risk with no financial backing behind me. Failure with TASC was not an option for me so I kept trying and asking different companies for their support until I was granted finance to get the ball rolling,” says Maddison.

TASC had already generated so much buzz that Maddison had a months’ worth of clients even before opening the doors.

“I had appointments booked in 1 month ahead before even opening the clinic, so I had a major deadline to meet with the builders and contractors. I remember working in the clinic back to back all day, by myself, doing 60hour weeks until I was brave enough/realised I need to start hiring and expand,” she says.

Maddison attributes the overwhelming amount of support her and the clinic have received to the fact that they are result driven and won’t let any client leave without feeling satisfied with their treatment.

Olivia&Thyme

“I think we have filled the gap for providing treatments that women and men desire but potentially couldn’t afford. We trial all treatments and products for a period to ensure we all truly are 100% are on board and believe in them,” she says.

“We WANT for our clients to see results, to change lives and to be as affordable as we can make it as well as being a place where people WANT to be seen, WANT to snapshot and talk about.”

The way that Maddison handles TASC as a young entrepreneur has been shaped by her mistreatment in the industry.

“The beauty and dermal industry can be so hard on females at times. All my girls have come from roles in the industry where there is a big presence of bullying from other employees, managers and clinic owners,” she says.

“When I started TASC, my biggest policy was an absolute zero tolerance to bullying and this is reiterated in my interviews with girls also. I simply treat my girls exactly how I want to be treated and exactly how I wasn’t treated when I was working in clinic… I ensure all of my girls are comfortable with their roster/hours, having two days off in a row, team bonding nights, trips away and only a flow of positivity for each other is present.”

As well as having only positive vibes and a love for her staff, Maddison is also incredibly passionate about helping women and men reach their skin goals, and so the TASC movement was started.

“The TASC movement is a program we run, where we take on women or men who have suffered from severe acne throughout their life, have tried everything and have been unable to find a solution. We take them under our wing and treat complimentary and provide complimentary product, ongoing, to help them achieve their ultimate skin goals and to feel beautiful again. All photos and throughout the process is filmed on our social media,” says Maddison.

Screen Shot 2018-07-30 at 6.28.30 pm.pngThe movement is just one of many things that makes The Aesthetic Skin Clinic a leader in the beauty industry and why Maddison has succeeded in her business – so much so that she is about to open a second clinic in Melbourne, a major milestone for any business owner.

Maddison’s ultimate goals for TASC is to go global.

“I would love for TASC to be worldwide, not a franchise as I like to be completely involved however I would love to have a few more boutique clinics in some key locations. LA, London and New York,” she says.

Maddison’s tips for anyone who may be thinking of venturing out into the world of business and entrepreneurship are to just go for it.

“Just do it! Get out of a job you hate and do what you really love. If you love it, you’re passionate about it and don’t believe in failure, then you will succeed. You need to set yourself apart from the rest and be willing to face challenges at all stages throughout your business venture. There is always ups and downs and that’s the excitement of business,” she says.

Check out TASC on their Instagram and book in with one of their lovely clinicians today for a treatment that will help you reach your skin goals!